2019 - BFA in the News

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July 9, 2019
WOSU (Columbus NPR) - Gun Safety Group Refiles Potential Ballot Issue Language

Groups against gun restrictions, such as the Buckeye Firearms Association, say expanding these background checks won’t reduce crime. The group cites a study that says 1% of guns used in crimes come from gun shows or personal transfers.

June 30, 2019
Columbus DispatchOhio’s gun lobby groups: same goal, different tactics

The Buckeye Firearms Association appears to be somewhere between the two other groups. Unlike Ohio Gun Owners and Ohioans for Concealed Carry, it has not offered testimony on the concealed carry bill and has not put out any sort of affirmative statement besides a brief news release informing its members of one of the bill’s hearings. The group has been a consistent presence in the gun debate for more than a decade, so its absence from the conversation about the bill is notable.

President Jim Irvine said the Buckeye Firearms Association has engaged in its normal advocacy efforts in support of the bill, but it does not want to jump in yet because the bill still needs to clear the House Criminal Justice Committee, the House floor and the Senate floor.

“In our mind, there’s no cause for some big celebration at this point,” Irvine said. “We work to educate legislators on a topic that we feel is important so that when it comes time to vote on it, they understand the issue, they’ve thought about it, and they agree that this is a good policy for the people of Ohio. It’s not the talk that matters; it’s the result that matters.”

That approach has worked, too: The organization has seen 20 bills signed into law since 2001 that advance its agenda.

June 26, 2019
WOIO (Fox Cleveland) - House Bill 178 would eliminate the need for a permit to carry a gun in Ohio

The Buckeye Firearms Association has come out in favor of House Bill 178 writing, “If we have the right to keep {own} and bear {carry} arms, then why do we need permission?”

June 15, 2019
WKSU (NPR Kent) - Gun Sale Background Check Proposal Could Go Before Voters

Dean Rieck with the Buckeye Firearms Association said what backers call the gun show loophole is largely a myth. He said dealers at gun shows face prosecution if they don’t do background checks. And he cites a study showing 1 percent of guns used in crimes came from gun shows or personal transfers.

“I really think that these kind of proposals are misleading and they’re not going to have any effect on true crime," Rieck said.

June 14, 2019
Norwalk ReflectorGroup mounts effort to expand background checks for gun purchases

According to the Buckeye Firearms Association, an Ohio group that supports gun rights, since November 1993, any commercial purchase of a gun in the U.S. requires a National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) check to be done by a federally licensed gun dealer.

Gun buyers must fill out a form providing information about themselves. Records must be stored for 20 years and are subject to inspection by agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, according to a 2016 article on background checks written by Keith Coniglio and posted at the Buckeye Firearms Association website.

Coniglio’s piece argues that background checks, and the records they create, are essentially a form of gun registration and can wind up being used to confiscate guns from law-abiding owners who have never committed a crime.

Gun registration records in New York City were used to confiscate semiautomatic rifles, so-called “assault weapons,” from more than 2,000 people, Coniglio’s piece states.

“A Staten Island man who announced his refusal to comply was the subject of a police raid. He was arrested, and his guns were seized,” the article states.

June 13, 2019
Statehouse News Bureau - Gun Rights Group Says Background Check Proposal Won't Affect Crime

Gun rights advocates say a proposal to require nearly all gun sales and transfers to go through federally licensed dealers and to require buyers to undergo background checks won’t have much of an effect on crime.

Dean Rieck with the Buckeye Firearms Association said what backers call the gun show loophole is largely a myth.

Rieck said dealers at gun shows face prosecution if they don’t do background checks. And he cites a study showing 1% of guns used in crimes came from gun shows or personal transfers. “I really think that these kind of proposals are misleading and they’re not going to have any effect on true crime," Rieck said.

June 13, 2019
SpectrumNews1.com - Gun Safety Group Pushes to Change Gun Laws

Dean Rieck, with Buckeye Firearms Association, says serious gun crime is rarely caused by people who have passed a background check, and come instead from theft and the black market. 

“People that we're worried about, truly violent criminals, they never go through background checks. So, this is yet another law that's going to target law-abiding gun owners who will go through the background checks,” said Rieck. “I think it’s sort of disingenuous for a group like this that really originates outside the state, to come in, pretend like they're grassroots, and try to get involved with Ohio law.”

June 12, 2019
WOWK (CBS Huntington) - Locals react to petition asking for universal background checks in Ohio

Others, like Tom Hall, a trainer with Buckeye Firearms Association and Foundation, disagree.

“You’re [going to] add additional requirements to law abiding citizens. A criminal is not [going to] go in and [buy a gun lawfully] if they require background checks,” said Hall. “A criminal is just going to go somewhere else. They’re going to transfer guns between criminals.”

June 11, 2019
Sandusky RegisterGroup mounts effort to expand background checks for gun purchases

According to the Buckeye Firearms Association, an Ohio group that supports gun rights, since November 1993, any commercial purchase of a gun in the U.S. requires a National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) check to be done by a federally licensed gun dealer.

Gun buyers must fill out a form providing information about themselves. Records must be stored for 20 years and are subject to inspection by agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, according to a 2016 article on background checks written by Keith Coniglio and posted at the Buckeye Firearms Association website.

Coniglio’s piece argues that background checks, and the records they create, are essentially a form of gun registration and can wind up being used to confiscate guns from law-abiding owners who have never committed a crime.

Gun registration records in New York City were used to confiscate semiautomatic rifles, so-called “assault weapons,” from more than 2,000 people, Coniglio’s piece states.

“A Staten Island man who announced his refusal to comply was the subject of a police raid. He was arrested, and his guns were seized,” the article states.

Many people who have committed mass murders in recent years were able to pass background checks, including Seung-Hui Cho, the Virginia Tech murderer who killed 32 people, and James Holmes, who killed a dozen people in a movie theater in 2012, the article says.

June 10, 2019
WBNS (CBS Columbus) - Group pushes for background checks on all gun sales in Ohio

The Buckeye Firearms Association says "There is no gun show loophole. The rules don't change when you walk into a gun show. The same laws apply either way. This is a big to-do about nothing. It will not stop any criminal from getting a gun."

June 10, 2019
Columbus Dispatch - Ohio voters could vote on gun background checks and president at same time

Jim Irvine, president of the Buckeye Firearms Association, is skeptical about the benefit the proposal, saying it addresses an issue that does not exist.

“There is no gun show loophole,” he said. “The rules to buying and selling guns at gun shows are the same to buy a gun at a gun store or out of the back of a car or a garage or anywhere else. The most common way criminals get their guns is stealing them. So what will this law do to stop those bad criminals from getting guns? Nothing.”

June 10, 2019
Gongwer News Service - Gun Safety Group Looks To The Ballot To Expand Background Checks

But at least one group of gun owners has its doubts that the proposal will reduce gun violence. Buckeye Firearms Association Executive Director Dan Rieck said the only people that will go through the background checks are law-abiding citizens.

"We don't believe it's really going to reduce crime. It's just going to be an additional burden on gun owners," he said.

The proposal would also require firearms dealers to maintain records on sales and transfers. Mr. Rieck likened that to a registry of gun owners.

"This proposal is really going to be problematic," he added.

While Ohioans for Gun Safety bills itself as a grassroots organization, Mr. Rieck sought to dispute that claim, saying it is backed by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Everytown for Gun Safety.

June 8, 2019
WCBE (NPR Columbus) - Cincinnati Joins Columbus In Suing State Over Local Gun Control Measures

The two cities are suing over the law that was backed by the National Rifle Association and the Buckeye Firearms Association.

June 6, 2019
Cleveland Jewish News - Pepper Pike Mayor Richard Bain: Removal of concealed carry training ‘bad idea’

Dean Rieck, executive director of Buckeye Firearms Association, which supports constitutional carry, said this proposal would not increase the danger to police officers or the general public. He said training is always good and the organization advocates for additional training but added if someone is going to be irresponsible with a gun, a permit will not change that.  

“The reality is the people who are responsible will continue to be responsible and the people who are irresponsible will continue to be irresponsible,” he said. “A license does not change someone’s fundamental nature.”

May 28, 2019
Cincinnati.com - Gun laws in Ohio: What's next for permitless carry, red flag and more?

"Gov. DeWine isn't a gun guy, so he's not like us in that," said Jim Irvine, president of Buckeye Firearms Association. "That sometimes creates problems."

...

"(DeWine's) someone who takes pride in Ohio and making Ohio the best state in the country to live in," said Irvine with Buckeye Firearms. Anyone shocked that DeWine is considering all his options on guns "doesn’t know the man or doesn’t understand him."

May 22, 2019
WBNS (CBS Columbus) - House Democrats propose several 'common sense' measures to counter gun violence

Mandatory gun locks when guns are stored in the home where children are present:

...

Dean Rieck of the Buckeye Firearms Association says the bill is unenforceable and won't solve anything.

"I think this bill will make no difference whatsoever if people want safety they should be teaching gun safety," Rieck says.

Red Flag Law:

This proposal would allow people to testify to have guns removed from a home where a person they know is a harm to themselves or others.

Opponents of the bill, like the Buckeye Firearms Association, say it takes away one's right to due process.

Block House Bill 178:

...

On the other hand, Rieck says if laws like these work in other places, Ohio should be no exception.

"We have 16 other states that have constitutional carry and it works there. I don't know what's so unusual about Ohio."

May 21, 2019
This Week Community News - Westerville council approves resolution opposing new concealed-carry bill

Prior to the resolution’s introduction, several residents addressed council, including Dean Rieck, a Westerville resident and executive director of pro-gun group Buckeye Firearms Association.

He said he didn’t like the proposed resolution because of the issue of home rule having been determined by the Ohio Supreme Court. He was referring to the court’s 5-2 ruling in 2010 that upholds as constitutional any state laws that displace local gun-control ordinances, as well as to a 2007 state law.

“I want to point out that there was a time when there was a patchwork of laws across the state,” he said. “It was a mess. You could literally be charged with status crimes just from moving from one city to another, going to the shooting range, going hunting or whatever.”

He said this was changed in March 2007, when one consistent law was approved at the state level.

“You’ve not had home rule on this for 12 years,” he said.

He said home rule has been well litigated, including by his own organization against the cities of Cincinnati, Columbus and Cleveland. He said all those cases were ruled in favor of his organization.

“This resolution, while well intended, is going to be a complete waste of time,” Rieck said.

May 15, 2019
WHIO (CBS Dayton) Proposed law would bring constitutional carry to Ohio

The Buckeye Firearms Association refer to this as constitutional carry, and it’s already been passed in more than a dozen states.

May 15, 2019
WLW (700 AM) - "The Bill Cunningham Show"

Buckeye Firearms Association Director Joe Eaton appeared on WLW with Bill Cunningham. Click here to listen to the podcast. Joe's segment begins at 34:18.

May 14, 2019
NRATV.com - "Relentless" w/ Dana Loesch

Buckeye Firearms Association Executive Director Dean Rieck appeared on NRATV's "Relentless" with show host Dana Loesch. Click here to view the segment.

May 13, 2019
Toledo BladeCoroner rules fatal shooting of 4-year-old an accident

Jim Irvine, president of Buckeye Firearms Association, said firearm safety is paramount for families who keep guns in the home. Children as young as 6 months old have the dexterity needed to pull a trigger, he said, and awareness can go a long way in preventing firearm accidents.

“Education really is key,” he said.

Guns should be stored unloaded and in a separate place from ammunition, he said. Concealed carry firearms are more complicated, he said, because those guns are loaded. But when concealed carry firearms are not in a holster on a person, they should be locked up as well, he said.

“You’ve got to come up with a safe way to store a legal gun,” he said.

Mr. Irvine added he owns guns, has children, and believes they must be taught progressing gun safety measures as they grow up. Babies who can’t yet crawl are not likely in danger of getting hold of a gun sitting on a table, but a teenager who knows their parents’ birthdays and anniversary could easily guess a simple password to a locked gun safe.

If someone is going to keep guns in the home, it’s important to introduce children to the guns through safety courses and education so they’ll know what to do if they see a firearm at someone else’s house, or at a party, or on the street, he said.

Mr. Irvine said he has met families who thought they were doing everything right about gun safety, and their children were still injured or killed by a gun shot in the home.

“Condolences to the family,” he said when he was told about Sunday’s incident in Toledo. “These events have a ripple effect that carries on forever.”

May 4, 2019
WKRC (CBS CIncinnati) - Faster Saves Lives training focuses on life-threatening injuries

Faster Saves Lives is a non-profit focused on active shooter training for schools, churches and businesses.

It was founded in response to the Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting in 2012.

It also has a medical component, tactical first aid, that anyone can sign up for.

Kris Garren was one of the 30 people who signed up for a training session on Saturday.

"I want to be one of those people who can help," Garren said. "If the worst happens and somebody is injured, I want to be one of those people that's in there and able to help. I don't want to be someone on the sideline."

She was a little nervous about seeing some of the bloody images that are part of the training.

"I've had a response in the past to seeing my own blood, if I have a cut or something," Garren said. "I'm afraid that I might pass out because I have in the past, passed out. So, I'm a little leery about coming to a class like this. I have to play some mental tricks to make sure that response doesn't happen."

Public shootings with multiple victims are almost a weekly occurrence now. Most recently at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, two people were killed and four others were hurt. Many more could've been injured or killed had it not been for the bravery of one of the victims. Riley Howell tackled the shooter but not before being fatally shot.

Joe Eaton with Faster Saves Lives says the training goes well beyond just active shooter attacks and basic first aid.

"Not only for violent events, but for severe weather or sports injuries, kitchen, lab, car accidents," Eaton said. "This is a type of training that they can get easily and can keep themselves and their family members or others alive in tragic situations."

The class learns how to properly put on a tourniquet, which could keep someone from bleeding out. It is focused on hands-on emergency medical training for life-threatening injuries.

"People need to realize, [with very simple tools], inexpensive tools and a little bit of training they can be very effective to save lives," Eaton said.

Eaton says the group has received a great response from the public since offering the classes.

"Several of our classes have sold out within the first day or two that we've listed them. We limit the size to only 30 people so they can get good, hands-on training with all the skills we want them to have," Eaton said.

They have already heard stories of folks saving lives with it.

"He had to use this training on his mother's farm. She fell and ran a stake up into her leg. He had to apply a tourniquet and rush her to the hospital to save her from bleeding at that point," Eaton said.

Click here if you would like to learn more about the training and Faster Saves Lives.

May 3, 2019
NRAILA.org - Grassroots Leadership Conference Wrap-Up

Sean Maloney, who is a member of the NRA’s Board of Directors and Co-Director of Faculty Administrator Safety Training Emergency Response (F.A.S.T.E.R.) in Ohio—a program launched by Buckeye Firearms Foundation to provide "active killer" threat stopping training to teachers and administrators, discussed how he educates and engages students in the gun debate via firearm training.

May 2, 2019
Ammoland.com - Knife Rights’ Ohio Knife Law Reform Bill Introduced

We sincerely appreciate the support we have received from our good friends at Buckeye Firearms Association in our efforts to get this bill introduced.

May 2, 2019
NRATV.com - "Relentless" w/ Dana Loesch

Buckeye Firearms Association Director Sean Maloney appeared on NRATV's "Relentless" with show host Dana Loesch.

May 2, 2019
WLW (700 AM) - "The Scott Sloan Show"

Buckeye Firearms Association Director Joe Eaton appeared on WLW with Scott Sloan. Click here to listen to the podcast.

May 2, 2019
Watchdog.org DeWine ‘red flag’ gun law proposal draws ire from some pro-gun groups

The Buckeye Firearms Association approached the issue differently and informed its members that the governor misspoke when he used the term “red flag,” suggesting that this legislation would be different than other states, according to the Columbus Dispatch.

The association wrote in a news release that it would work with the governor to find an alternative to red flag legislation, but that it would oppose a red flag law that violates due process rights.

May 1, 2019
Associated Press Ohio governor to pursue law taking guns from people at risk

DeWine's comments prompted pushback by the pro-gun group Buckeye Firearms Association, which said officials of the organization were told that DeWine misspoke when he used the "red flag" phrase.

Tierney told The Dispatch that wasn't true.

...

Dean Rieck, executive director of Buckeye Firearms Association, on Wednesday pointed to a statement posted on the organization's website that said existing state laws "deal with violence and mental concerns" and counter "all the needless calls for 'Red Flag' laws." Rieck declined to be interviewed.

Jim Irvine, Buckeye Firearms' board president, said Wednesday that red flag laws in other states are used to unjustly seize firearms.

"That's why it's a nerve button for gun owners," Irvine said.

He said the group would be willing to listen if problems are found in Ohio's current laws that need to be addressed.

"No one has brought one to me, but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist," he said.

May 1, 2019
Columbus Dispatch Ohio gun group falsely reports DeWine misspoke about ‘red flag’ legislation

A leading Ohio gun-rights group falsely informed its members that Gov. Mike DeWine “misspoke” when he said his office is working to draft “red flag” legislation.

Expressing alarm over recent fatal shootings in houses of worship, DeWine said Monday that he is working to come up with a bill that would permit judges to order the seizure of guns from people found to be a danger to themselves or others.

 

In a Tuesday email to members, Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, said the group contacted administration officials to express their alarm. “We have been told that the governor misspoke when pressed by the media about red flag laws,” he wrote.

“And we have been assured that there is NO red flag bill under consideration by this administration and there will NOT be one.”

DeWine did not misspeak and his staff is indeed working to draft a “red flag” bill, said Dan Tierney, the first-year Republican’s press secretary.

“There is not a bill currently drafted. As Gov. DeWine stated, he has asked his team to work on this issue, and that is ongoing. Since the governor’s goal is to eventually draft a bill that can pass the Ohio General Assembly, we will continue to talk to and work with relevant interested parties, including the Buckeye Firearms Association, on this issue,” Tierney said.

Rieck did not respond Monday to a request for comment.

Jim Irvine, president of the Buckeye Firearms Association, said he had not talked with Rieck, but attributed his statement to members to apparent “miscommunication and imprecise use of the words ‘red flag.’”

“We need to use better words ... the governor and the media,” Irvine said. “That phrase means different things to different people ... ‘red flag’ is not a legal term, it’s a media term,” Irvine said, suggesting DeWine is not out to seek a law of the type enacted in California, which allows any family member or law-enforcement officer to request guns to be taken away from people believed to be at risk of hurting themselves or others.

A statement by Rieck on the group’s website differed from the email sent to its members. “We have been assured that there is NO current red flag bill drafted and we have been helping the governor explore options for safety and due process,” the website says.

The Buckeye Firearms Association fought former Gov. John Kasich’s proposal for a “red flag” law and other measures designed to reduce gun violence last year. The Republican-controlled General Assembly did not act on any of the proposals, to the governor’s dismay.

The group and other gun-rights organizations oppose such legislation.

Buckeye Firearms President Jim Irvine said last year, “No sane person wants evil or dangerous persons to have access to firearms to kill innocent people.

“Many people think confiscating guns from people who have not done anything wrong will somehow stop criminals from killing. That is an insane idea that must be confronted at every turn,” Irvine said.

May 1, 2019
WTVN (610 AM) - "The Mark Blazor Show"

Buckeye Firearms Association President Jim Irvine appeared on WTVN with Mark Blazor. Click here to listen to the podcast.

May 1, 2019
KRC (550 AM) - "The Brian Thomas Morning Show"

Buckeye Firearms Association Director Joe Eaton appeared on KRC's "The Brian Thomas Morning Show" with host Brian Thomas. Click here to listen to the podcast.

April 30, 2019
NRATV.com

Buckeye Firearms Association Director Sean Maloney appeared on NRATV's "Relentless" with show host Dana Loesch. Sean's segment begins at 14:54.

April 29, 2019
Gongwer News Service - Governor Plans Push For 'Red Flag' Gun Law

At least one guns rights group is likely to oppose any effort to take another stab at pushing for a red flag law.

"As a rule, we do not support red flag laws because every one that we've ever seen does not respect due process," Buckeye Firearms Association Executive Director Dean Rieck said in an interview.

Although he said he understand what the governor is hoping to accomplish, Mr. Rieck said he believes there are already means for law enforcement to seize firearms in certain cases.

"We really don't see the point of new laws," he said.

April 17, 2019
WOSU (Columbus NPR) - How Easy Is It To Buy A Gun In Ohio? Depends Where You're Shopping

Perhaps on the opposite end of the debate is Dean Rieck. He’s the executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, a pro-gun group that wants private gun transactions to follow the pattern of any other online sale. 

“I have a mower that I want to get rid of,” Rieck says. “I’ll probably post that somewhere. If someone is interested, I’ll give them the mower. They’ll give me money. And that’s it. It’s the same with guns. The difference is that if you’re going to do this on a regular basis you’re considered a dealer and you have to have licensed.”

At what point does a person who is selling guns privately become a dealer? It's complicated.

“Well,” Rieck says. “There’s nothing in the law that says at X number of guns or over X number of weeks that that happens.”

Buckeye Firearms supports measures to roll back concealed-carry laws. Right now, Ohioans who want to carry a concealed weapon have to take classes and be licensed. But that’s only if a person want to conceal a firearm.

Ohio is a so-called open-carry state, which means person who can legally own a gun in Ohio is legally allowed to march down the street with that gun. They just can’t hide it.

“But if I pick my shirt and cover up that gun, now suddenly I must be dangerous because I have to be licensed,” Rieck says. “I have to do a background check. I have to do training, and I have to go through all the hoops to put my shirt over that gun. That makes no sense.”

Rieck says that a “constitutional carry” policy, which would allow people to carry concealed weapons without classes or licensing, would be more sensible.

April 16, 2019
NRATV.com

Buckeye Firearms Association Vice President Linda Walker appeared on NRATV.com.

April 13, 2019
Columbus Dispatch Sportsmen’s groups back fee increases

Organizations onboard include Ducks Unlimited, National Wild Turkey Federation — Ohio Chapter, Ohio State Trappers Association, Ohio Conservation Federation, League of Ohio Sportsmen, Ohio Pheasants Forever, Ohio Quail Forever, Ohio Bass Federation, Ohio Husky Musky Club, Buckeye Firearms Association, Safari Club International Ohio, Headhunters Club and numerous local chapters and county groups.

April 13, 2019
Toledo BladeBump stocks illegal now, but few, if any, local owners have turned theirs in

The Buckeye Firearms Association disagrees with the federal ban and takes issue with the lack of a buy-back program.

“We don’t think the ban is constitutional,” spokesman Joe Eaton said. “The taking of private property without compensation should not happen. But we do ask our users and supporters to follow the federal law.”

April 10, 2019
WYSO (NPR Dayton) - Buying A Gun In Ohio: WYSO Explores The Debate, The Law

Perhaps on the opposite end of the debate is Dean Rieck. He’s the executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, a pro-gun group that wants private gun transactions to follow the pattern of any other online sale. 

“I have a mower that I want to get rid of,” Rieck says. “I’ll probably post that somewhere. If someone is interested, I’ll give them the mower. They’ll give me money. And that’s it. It’s the same with guns. The difference is that if you’re going to do this on a regular basis you’re considered a dealer and you have to have licensed.”

At what point does a person who is selling guns privately become a dealer? It's complicated.

“Well,” Rieck says. “There’s nothing in the law that says at X number of guns or over X number of weeks that that happens.”

Buckeye Firearms supports measures to roll back concealed-carry laws. Right now, Ohioans who want to carry a concealed weapon have to take classes and be licensed. But that’s only if a person want to conceal a firearm.

Ohio is a so-called open-carry state, which means person who can legally own a gun in Ohio is legally allowed to march down the street with that gun. They just can’t hide it.

“But if I pick my shirt and cover up that gun, now suddenly I must be dangerous because I have to be licensed,” Rieck says. “I have to do a background check. I have to do training, and I have to go through all the hoops to put my shirt over that gun. That makes no sense.”

Rieck says that a “constitutional carry” policy, which would allow people to carry concealed weapons without classes or licensing, would be more sensible.

April 6, 2019
WLW (AM 700) - Big Outdoors

Buckeye Firearms Association's Larry Moore was a guest on WLW's Big Outdoors. Click here to listen to the podcast.

April 1, 2019
Cleveland Plain Dealer Capitol Letter - Shoot Me a Message

Looks like Attorney General Dave Yost’s office and the Buckeye Firearms Association are still staying in touch following news reports that Yost’s office privately notified the pro-gun group about briefs it was filing in two gun lawsuits. According to the Columbus Dispatch’s Darrel Rowland, the AG’s office alerted Buckeye Firearms to gun-related state legislation and – at the group’s request -- sent a letter to the National Rifle Association suggesting that a Columbus gun instructor’s certification be revoked after losing his conceal-carry license.

March 31, 2019
Cleveland Plain Dealer Year after ‘March for our Lives’ to end gun violence, Parkland students see progress

Where Patrick sees progress, Jim Irvine, president of the Buckeye Firearms Association, sees setback. His organization has argued for arming teachers as a solution to school shootings, and he said that last year’s gun-control march was a political propaganda campaign spearheaded by gun-control groups and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg rather than the Parkland survivors.

“They put out a lot of bad information,” he said of the march, saying, “I think in a sense it’s made our schools less safe because good people were given bad information. Their agenda is driven by a political ideology to ban guns. It’s not driven by an ideology to make schools safe.”

Irvine calls the march “yesterday’s news.”

“Making drugs illegal has not solved our drug problem, and it’s not going to,” he said. “And banning guns isn’t going to solve the gun-violence problems.”

March 29, 2019
Columbus Dispatch Capitol Insider: Yost keeps pro-gun groups up to speed, records reveal

Who ya gonna call?

If you’re Attorney General Dave Yost and his senior staff, the answer is the Buckeye Firearms Association, reporter Randy Ludlow discovered.

Yost raised eyebrows last month when his office distributed a news release about his office filing friend-of-the-court briefs asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review two out-of-state lower court rulings restricting access to guns.

The release was given only to the Buckeye Firearms Association, not to reporters.

A public records request to Yost’s office for its correspondence with the pro-gun group shows the two stay in contact.

For example, Yost’s lieutenants flagged the organization to gun-related legislation at the Statehouse and apparently sent a letter to the National Rifle Association at the group’s request.

The Buckeye Firearms Association apparently was out to revoke the NRA certification of a Columbus gun instructor who lost his concealed carry license when convicted of a misdemeanor involving a gun.

The group forwarded the name of NRA training officials to Yost’s office, and it wrote a letter suggesting the NRA revoke the man’s stamp of approval, which it did.

March 29, 2019
Cleveland Plain Dealer Ohio is closer than ever to allowing concealed weapons without a permit, supporters say

“I never expected it to pass during prior sessions,” said Jim Irvine, president of the pro-gun rights Buckeye Firearms Association. “But I think this session it is likely to.”

...

“It’s not something that’s like this ‘holy cow’ controversial thing,” Irvine said of conceal-carry without a permit. “It’s like, well this is ‘common-sense, let’s knock this out of the way quick and easy’ type stuff.”

March 29, 2019
WBNS (CBS Columbus) Bill introduced to allow Ohioans to carry guns without permit, background checks

“It would allow, anyone who is legally able to carry a firearm, to carry that firearm,” said Ken Hanson, attorney for Buckeye Association.

...

“The licensing classes take time and it is somewhat a bar to entry. There's certainly a segment of people,” Hanson said.

March 26, 2019
WRGT (Fox Dayton) - Miami Valley responds to ban on bump stocks that just went into effect

Buckeye Firearms Association said it strongly disagrees with the ruling by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) "clarifying" that bump stocks are "machine guns."

"This was a purely political act," Executive Director of Buckeye Firearms Association Dean Rieck said. "Like other gun-related bans, it will not reduce violence and will only have the effect of infringing on the rights of gun owners nationwide."

Buckeye Firearms Association said as of Tuesday, a bump stock is now considered a machine gun under federal law and the penalty for illegal possession of a machine gun is imprisonment of up to 10 years, a fine of up to $250,000, or both.

"In our view, this is absurd in the extreme," Rieck said.

March 26, 2019
WLWT (NBC Cincinnati) - It is now illegal to buy, sell or own a bump stock in the United States

"Banning bump stocks does not solve all of our problems relative to gun violence, to mass shootings, the scourge that this is in our society, but I think there's moral obligation and a safety obligation to do everything that we can do. So every step we can take, let's take it," said Cincinnati Council member P.G. Sittenfeld.

Sittenfeld sponsored legislation to ban bumps stocks in Cincinnati last year.

It was met with a legal challenge by Buckeye Firearms Association.

Sean Maloney represents that group.

"I'm always cognizant and troubled by the fact, when things like bump stocks, components of firearms or magazines are banned, because it takes the focus away from what I think to be the true problem in America, and that's mental health," said Maloney.

...

Maloney says gun owners must abide by the ban, but it has created a stir in the firearm community.

"Kind of troublesome because did the ATF have the authority to do what really only Congress should do? And then, it's taking without compensation. Everybody who has them has to destroy them or divest themselves of those," said Maloney.

March 22, 2019
Ideastream.org- With No National Standards, Policies For Arming Teachers Are Often Left To Local School Districts

Some school districts in Ohio have decided to allow armed teachers. It is unclear how many because there is no official statewide tracking mechanism. In 2013, a gun rights lobbying group called the Buckeye Firearms Association stepped in and began offering training for teachers and staff who would carry firearms.

Buckeye’s three-day training session shows teachers how to stop an active shooter. It includes role-playing and a crash course in police tactics.

According to Buckeye Firearms executive director Dean Rieck, nearly 200 districts across Ohio have attended. Rieck said training sessions were carefully chosen to fit school shooting scenarios.

“We went to the trainers who train police and train SWAT and train military,” Rieck said. “So we went to the people who are at the top of the food chain for this type of training.”

...

Ohio districts are free to rely on Buckeye’s training.

March 20, 2019
NRATV's "Relentless" with host Dana Loesch - Dean Rieck: City of Columbus Suing Ohio over Anti-Gun Bill

Buckeye Firearms Association Executive Director Dean Rieck was a guest on NRATV's "Relentless" with host Dana Loesch. Click here to view the interview.

March 12, 2019
WCBE (NPR Columbus) - City Of Columbus Suing Ohio Over Gun Legislation

On December 28, the Ohio General Assembly voted to override then Governor John Kasich’s veto of House Bill 228. The bill, which takes effect March 28, also shifts the burden of proof in self-defense cases to the prosecution. The legislation had strong support from pro-gun groups, including the Buckeye Firearms Association.

March 12, 2019
Guns.com - Ohio governor signs 'fix' to prevent accidental gun control

The emergency bill, HB 86, becomes law on March 28, the same date as HB 228. As noted by the Buckeye Firearms Association, “No firearms were ever banned as a result of this swift action by the Ohio General Assembly.”

March 11, 2019
Akron Beacon-Journal Medical marijuana, concealed-carry applicants caught in crossfire

Like oil and water, a concealed-carry license and a medical marijuana card don’t blend together, says Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, a statewide gun rights advocacy group.

“We estimate there are 4 million gun owners in Ohio in some form,” Rieck said. “And some of those are probably going to use medical marijuana.”

Federal law makes no provision for the use of marijuana for medical reasons, Rieck said. In fact, it is still considered a Schedule 1 substance by the U.S. government — one without an accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.

...

“I think a lot of people don’t understand federal law and state law can conflict,” Rieck said. With about 667,000 concealed-carry license holders in the state and the rapid expansion of the state marijuana registry, there’s going to be overlap. When that happens, Rieck said, “You have to choose between guns and marijuana.”

...

Buckeye Firearms supports the idea of “constitutional carry,” which allows any legal gun owner to conceal-carry without a permit or license. Several states have adopted the approach and haven’t had significant issues arising from it, Rieck said.

Unless Ohio decides to go in that direction, concealed-carry applicants who are seeking pain relief from medical marijuana are in a quandary.

March 11, 2019
Akron Beacon-Journal Ohio issues record number of concealed-carry licenses

The number of license holders has expanded steadily statewide since the law’s introduction in 2004. Currently, about 667,000 Ohio residents possess a concealed-carry license, according to the Buckeye Firearms Association. The licenses must be renewed every five years.

...

Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, said that about 1 in 13 Ohio residents has a concealed-carry license, and that the holders represent a good cross-section of society.

“They are everywhere,” he said. “They are sitting next to you in restaurants. They are your neighbors.”

March 11, 2019
Columbus DispatchNew Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine signs first bill into law - on guns

The new law corrects inadvertent wording that included firearms with an overall length of at least 26 inches — taking in many rifles and shotguns — as “dangerous ordnance.”

Groups such as the Buckeye Firearms Association, Ohioans for Concealed Carry and the Ohio Gun Collectors Association, whose leaders attended the bill-signing ceremony, lobbied lawmakers to swiftly correct the mistake.

March 9, 2019
Americas1stFreedom.org - Armed Teacher Decision Survives Challenge in Ohio

An Ohio county’s decision to let educators carry on campus, provided they had been through the FASTER Saves Lives training program, has survived a legal challenge from a group of parents pushing to require police-level training for any school employee to carry on campus.

Not long after a school shooting a few years ago, the Madison County school system wrestled with the question of whether to allow teachers and administrators to carry at school as a way to provide an additional line of defense in an active-shooter incident. The school board voted to allow armed staff, then considered what kind of training would be required. They soon determined that if a teacher went through Ohio’s FASTER program, that teacher could carry on campus.

A group of parents contended that the FASTER training wasn’t enough. Instead, they wanted to require full training for peace officers—some 700 hours of coursework—as a condition for staff to carry. But a Butler County Common Pleas Court judge saw no need to mandate such extensive instruction and determined that the FASTER program—which has attracted teachers from other states—was sufficient.

 "This ruling is a victory for school safety in Ohio,” said Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association. “While I won’t disparage the motives of the parents who brought the suit, this was really a case of well-funded, out-of-state political activists coming to Ohio with an agenda.”

...

“Given that no school employee could ever be expected to complete over 700 hours of training, and given the expense of hiring security or police officers, a loss by Madison Local Schools in this case could create precedent that could potentially prevent anyone from being armed in Ohio schools and making them completely defenseless from active killers looking for easy targets,” Rieck said.

...

As school districts debate the merits of allowing teachers to carry, programs like FASTER have been devised to give educators defensive training and first aid skills. For a glimpse at how much of a draw the concept is, consider that when FASTER announced a class in 2012, it was looking for 24 students; more than 1,000 applicants filed for the positions.

The training has since spread to other states, and over the last past six years, more than 2,000 school employees from 250 school districts have taken the course.

March 1, 2019
WKRC (CBS Cincinnati) - Local school district wins court battle, will allow arming teachers, personnel

A lawyer for the school tells Local 12 that personnel are not required to carry a weapon but can whenever they want. District policy allows for up to 10 staff members to get training. It’s being done through the FASTER program that’s connected to the Buckeye Firearms Association.

March 1, 2019
Columbus DispatchEditorial: These briefs should not be hidden from public view

Yost’s office prepared a press release explaining that he had signed on to friend-of-the-court briefs in two lawsuits asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review lower court rulings upholding laws that restrict access to guns. But, unlike his usual blast out to reporters and others on an email list, the release went only to the Buckeye Firearms Association, a pro-gun group sure to approve of the challenge to the laws.

February 28, 2019
WCPO (ABC Cincinnati) - Judge rules teachers don’t need police-level training to carry guns in Madison schools

In a news release, a pro-gun advocacy group called the Buckeye Firearms Association praised the ruling and accused a gun control advocacy group of using the parents to advance its agenda. The plaintiffs had been supported by Everytown for Gun Safety, which works nationwide to implement what its members call common-sense gun reform.

...

According to a motion filed by the Buckeye Firearms Foundation asking to intervene in the case — the judge denied the request — they provided the 27-hour training.

“Certain teachers and staff members of the Madison Local Schools have been approved by their board of education and have participated in the FASTER program,” the motion reads. “Participation in the program has provided educators practical violence response training, including response with handguns and to provide emergency first aide to victims of violence.”

February 26, 2019
Columbus DispatchYost quietly joins pro-gun legal fights - and only tells firearms group

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost has quietly joined two friend-of-the-court briefs asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review a pair of lower-court rulings restricting access to guns.

How quietly? A Feb. 20 release from Yost’s office about the legal moves led by Republican officials only was given to the pro-gun Buckeye Firearms Association, which published it verbatim on its website.

The document, marked for “immediate release” and identical to other public statements issued by Yost’s office, was not shared with reporters and thus, the general public.

Asked why the 12-paragraph release was not issued publicly, Yost spokesman Dave O’Neil replied, “We submitted content for their newsletter in a release format ... The (court) briefs mentioned in the (Buckeye Firearms) newsletter article are public and have been public since Jan. 18 and Feb. 4, respectively.”

...

The Buckeye Firearms Association, the only group to receive Yost’s release, endorsed the Republican for election as attorney general last year, as did the National Rifle Association and Ohioans for Concealed Carry.

February 26, 2019
Gongwer News Service - Senate Approves Firearm Correction Bill

The corrective measure was supported by firearm groups, including the Buckeye Firearms Association. Sean Maloney, an attorney who testified on behalf of the group before the committee, said the legislation was a "common-sense fix" to an unintended consequence.

February 25, 2019
NRATV's "Relentless" with host Dana Loesch - Dean Rieck: Ohio Lawmakers Studying Error That Could Ban Some Guns

Buckeye Firearms Association Executive Director Dean Rieck was a guest on NRATV's "Relentless" with host Dana Loesch. Click here to view the interview.

February 19, 2019
Gongwer News Service - GOP Fast-Tracks Legislative Fix To Recent Gun Law

"Notwithstanding this misclassification, upon consultation with the attorneys at (Legislative Service Commission) it appears that the amended language would not affect the legality of any existing firearms," she said.

Gun advocates aren't so certain. The Buckeye Firearms Association and Ohioans for Concealed Carry in recent weeks have sounded the alarm to lawmakers hoping for a quick fix.

February 18, 2019
Cleveland Plain DealerOhio guns-rights groups up in arms over law change

Dean Rieck, executive director of the Buckeye Firearms Association, said while it’s unclear whether the law will affect gun owners in “real world terms” once it takes effect in March, it’s still causing concern among gun owners.

February 18, 2019
Associated Press - Error in Ohio bill could ban some guns

It’s unclear if the mistake would cause gun owners problems in “real-world terms,” said Dean Rieck, executive director of the gun rights group Buckeye Firearms, who said he’s consulted with lawyers for the National Rifle Association and Ohio’s Legislative Services Commission, among others.

Nevertheless, “We would prefer they deal with it immediately because it is causing a lot of concern and confusion among gun owners in Ohio,” Rieck said.

February 13, 2019
NRATV.com

Buckeye Firearms Association Vice President Linda Walker appeared on NRATV.com.

February 12, 2019
Guns.com - Court shoots down city bump stock ban

The lawsuit, brought by the Buckeye Firearms Foundation and Ohioans for Concealed Carry, argued the local ban was illegal considering state laws.

“This ban was completely unjustified and a great concern for gun owners,” said Dean Rieck, executive director of Buckeye Firearms Foundation. “Under Ohio law, local municipalities are not permitted to enact firearms laws that conflict with state law. And clearly, outlawing guns or gun parts is a clear violation of state law.”

February 12, 2019
Pacific Standard Magazine - Should teachers carry guns? In many rural school districts, they already are.

According to Joe Eaton, the program director of an Ohio-based program called FASTER (Faculty/Administrator Safety Training & Emergency Response) Saves Lives, which provides first-aid and firearm training to school staff, more and more school boards are coming around to his view that violence in schools should be treated like any other school emergency. "If you have a kid that falls into a swimming pool, are you going to stand at the side of the pool and dial 911? That's ridiculous. You're going to jump in the pool, you're going to pull the kid out, you're going to start saving lives while you're still waiting for the professionals to get there," Eaton says. "That's where the biggest mindset has changed, is that schools realize, no matter how much they prepare ahead of time, if violence starts there is always going to be a certain period of time when they are 100 percent on their own, because until that first 911 call is made, nobody is coming to help."

That's just the kind of preparation that FASTER provides: not just practice time on a range, but first aid for traumatic injuries, tactical exercises, role playing—a crash course in the kind of training that law enforcement officers get. FASTER is meant to prepare teachers not to replace first responders, but just to hold their own until law enforcement can get there.

"Firearms are the last resort to stop these situations," Eaton says. "We teach the staff how to safely remove themselves and groups of kids from an area of danger; how to barricade in a room; how to deal with large chaotic crowds, and all the trauma and medical training to provide compression bandages, chest seals, airway management, to start immediately rendering the medical aid. That way when the professionals get there you actually have patients to transfer to them instead of victims"

The Ohio superintendent credits the FASTER program with giving administrators in his district the tools to prepare for the worst-case scenario, should it ever arrive. The district's armed response team conducts active shooter drills with key school staff and the sheriff's department after hours, and once a year all staff and students participate in a lockdown drill, which is mandated by Ohio law.

...

When asked how often FASTER-trained school employees have used their training to avert an incident, only a couple examples come to Eaton's mind: in one, a school principal in eastern Ohio allegedly drew his firearm on a student off school grounds, prompting the student to immediately drop a weapon he was carrying. But Eaton takes the rarity of such incidents as a sign the program may be working as a school-violence deterrent: "We hope that we never have any additional stories beyond that because one thing that we encourage schools to do is that, if they adopt this program, to be public about it," he says, "because announcing publicly should have a certain deterrent effect."

February 11, 2019
Cincinnati.com - Hamilton County judge strikes down city's bump stock ban

Two groups, Buckeye Firearms Foundation and Ohioans for Concealed Carry, sued the city in June 2018.

“This ban was completely unjustified and a great concern for gun owners,” Dean Rieck, executive director of Buckeye Firearms Foundation, said in a statement. “Under Ohio law, local municipalities are not permitted to enact firearms laws that conflict with state law. And clearly, outlawing guns or gun parts, is a clear violation of state law.”

...

Buckeye Firearms Foundation said other municipalities, including Columbus, “have attempted to defy state law in this manner, only to lose in court.” A Franklin County judge last year said the Columbus ban was unconstitutional.

“These bans are not about public safety,” Rieck said. “They are merely political theater and an excuse for city councils to 'virtue signal' for publicity and personal aggrandizement.”

February 11, 2019
WCPO (Cincinnati) - Judge sides with gun owners' groups, overrules Cincinnati's ban on bump stocks

The Buckeye Firearms Association and Ohioans for Concealed Carry filed suit June 21, 2018, arguing that the ordinance violated a state law preventing individual cities and counties from creating policies that conflict with their state and federal counterparts. A judge granted their motion for a temporary injunction preventing the ordinance from taking effect.

Court records indicate the case persisted through the rest of 2018, the city continuing to argue that bump stocks were firearm accessories and could therefore be regulated without infringing on state law or gun owners’ rights.

In November, both the city and the gun owners’ groups filed motions for summary judgment in their favor. Ruehlman granted the latter Monday.

“This ban was completely unjustified and a great concern for gun owners,” Buckeye Firearms Foundation executive director Dean Rieck wrote in a news release, adding later: “These bans are not about public safety. They are merely political theater and an excuse for City Councils to 'virtue signal' for publicity and personal aggrandizement.”

The local victory is likely to be overwhelmed by a national loss by the start of summer. On Dec. 18, 2018, the Trump administration announced a federal ban on bump stocks set to take effect the following March.

...

Gun owners’ organizations such as Gun Owners of America promised a lawsuit as soon as the policy was announced, meaning members of the Buckeye Firearms Association could soon see their fight reenacted on a national stage.

February 5, 2019
WLWT (NBC Cincinnati) - Shooting death of Clermont County deputy reignites interest in red flag law

Gun rights activist Joe Eaton, who's with Buckeye Firearms Association, is skeptical.

"You cannot strip people of their rights and their property ahead of time," Eaton said. "This young man had troubles, and there are already laws out there that people can be either voluntarily or involuntarily committed for diagnosis of this type of treatment."

February 4, 2019
WXIX (Fox Cincinnati) - Ohio lawmakers look to re-introduce ‘red flag law’ after deputy’s death in standoff

Those who oppose the idea, like the Buckeye Firearms Association, believe that the current laws are already designed to prevent those kinds of tragedies.

“There are already laws in place where somebody can be involuntarily committed for psychological evaluation and have a court determine if they are competent or not competent," said Joe Eaton with the Buckeye Firearms Association.

Opponents also argue that it is important for Ohioans to have the right to self-defense.

“They totally strip the citizens of Ohio of their due process," said Eaton. "Everyone in Ohio should be innocent until they’ve been proven guilty of committing a crime.”

Thomas said they plan to re-introduce the red flag law and other gun bills as early as this week.

Leaders of the Buckeye Firearm Association expect they will fight it.

February 4, 2019
Good Morning Britain - Should School Teachers Carry Guns?

Buckeye Firearms Association Director and FASTER Saves Lives Program Director Joe Eaton was a guest on Good Morning Britain with host Piers Morgan.

February 4, 2019
Evening Standard - Teachers Training To Kill: A new Channel 4 documentary explores a special camp arming US teachers

The training camp in question is FASTER which teaches high school teachers to wield and, if necessary, use guns to deal with potential shooting situations.

February 4, 2019
TheGuardian.com - Examination of Teachers Training to Kill- The Struggle to Arm Elementary Schools

Perhaps the greatest achievement of the film was to find two women at a weapons training camp run by a National Rifle Association (NRA)-funded charity, Faster, and let them be the sympathetic faces of those who do want teachers armed. They both teach young special needs children, and often buy their struggling students clothes and food, too. They see gun training as an extension of the extra care they are already willing to give. The daughter of one has had a shooting at her school. They are tearful, not gung ho, and their feeling of helplessness is almost palpable. “I want to take care of who I’m responsible for,” says one. “They’re babies!” says the other, desperately. “That’s why we’re here.”

The camp involves all the kinds of tuition you’d expect – shooting practice, role play, full-scale enactments of various situations. Much of it looks enough like boys rushing round with toys to make you wonder about the purity of everyone’s motives. But then a whole other field of WTF opens up when the Vietnam veteran in charge of “mindset training” plays a video to show his adult students what they “could be” dealing with. It purports to be of the “Cubs of Allah”, and shows children training to be, you presume, jihadists. “How many people are coming into this country, and you don’t know how they’ve been trained?” he asks. His Faster colleagues hit the remaining NRA markers quicker than you can say “libtard”

February 4, 2019
RealityTitBit.com - Inside the 'gun summer school' in C4's Teachers Training to Kill

The summer school was featured in Teachers Training to Kill is called Faster.

Gun’s right group, Faster, offer free gun training, where teachers learn how to use guns, deal with potential school shooting scenarios and even kill.

February 4, 2019
Channel4.com - Teachers Training to Kill

This documentary meets teachers in Ohio who are learning to shoot and - if necessary - kill; and explores the heated debate in America around how best to protect pupils from gun attacks.

February 1, 2019
NRATV.com

Buckeye Firearms Association Director Sean Maloney appeared on NRATV.com.

February 1, 2019
The Ledger-Independent - MLSD Superintendent addresses arming staff

Rau said in the newsletter that staff members will undergo training by the Tactical Defense Institute using the Faculty/Administrator Safety Training and Emergency Response Program, or FASTER, in West Union, Ohio, and that the program itself is strictly voluntary. According to Rau, the trainers, trainees and weapons will be identical to law enforcement.

“Those individuals will train for several hours over the course of several days, and must pass this course; not everyone passes this course,” he said. “The training is extremely rigorous and is mentally and physically difficult.”

...

Training through TDI will be free, Rau said, with the Buckeye Firearms Association paying for five people to undergo the training. Despite the possibility for five people to take the training for free, Rau said he wants to be thorough in determining who is fit for the program.

...

To further supplement the information posted in the newsletter, Rau also said he will also be putting additional information about the FASTER program in the March newsletter.

February 1, 2019
Financial Times - Training Teachers to Kill, Channel 4 — guns to solve the problem of guns

A gun rights group, Faster, offers free training. “You find me somebody who wants more dead kids,” says a spokesman for the cause of getting more guns to solve the problem of guns. In a Faster video, Jim Irvine declares that arming civilians has “worked wonderfully well throughout our country for decades”. That’s one way of putting it. Jim’s own kids are homeschooled, but lest you think him hypocritical, it’s because he believes gun-free zones are an active invitation to shooters.

January 17, 2019
Portsmouth Daily Times Sheriff’s office hands prosecutor case against Lucasville weapons instructor

Rick Jones is a local firearms instructor as well as the south-central Ohio spokesperson for the Buckeye Firearms Association. He said should problems be found with the firearm instruction classes given by any instructor, persons who used that instructor to gain a concealed carry permit likely will lose that permit.

In December, Jones talked about another case currently underway against an instructor in Akron. He said several years ago an Ohio instructor was convicted of selling course completion certificates without actually requiring buyers take any training. Persons who had used the instructor lost any money they paid to that person and any who had gained a permit through that instructor, lost their permit.

January 15, 2019
America's 1st FreedomBuckeye Firearms [Association] Praises Override of Gun Veto

Members of the Ohio General Assembly stood firm in their fight to protect the rights of Ohioans to use firearms to protect themselves. That dedication to the rights of everyday citizens won praise from the Buckeye Firearms Association (BFA).

And while we can chalk up a point for our Second Amendment rights in the Buckeye State, those who want to exercise their constitutional rights know the fight is not over.

At question was House Bill (H.B.) 228 that, among other things, contained a provision related to the Castle Doctrine, granting law-abiding citizens the right to protect themselves and others without fear of being prosecuted.

Then-Gov. John Kasich went out of his way not only to veto the bill, but to introduce less-than-savory amendments—and he waited until the last minute to reject the bill, no doubt hoping that lawmakers would rather spend time with their families than to worry about an override.

But the legislators got the last word, coming back during the recess and convincingly beating the veto with a House vote of 67-22 and a Senate vote of 21-11.

“The key with H.B. 228 was that it shifted the burden of proof to the prosecution,” BFA Executive Director Dean Rieck said.

The news wasn’t 100 percent favorable. In overriding the veto, lawmakers had to remove some provisions and had to keep the “duty to retreat” in the bill. Rieck said the new governor and Legislature will undoubtedly have to deal with the “duty to retreat” matter soon. Still, gun owners in Ohio will enjoy “innocent until proven guilty” protection, a stronger preemption law and other broader rights.

It was an uphill battle not simply because an override is generally a challenge, but because anti-gun groups like Moms Demand Action spent millions trying to water down the bill—and they did win in terms of defeating the push for a true Stand Your Ground option.

“In the end, gun owners won and did so without big power or big money to back them up,” Rieck said.

The Ohio case is another piece of evidence that grassroots efforts—a cornerstone of the NRA’s strategy—can work. But, as Rieck acknowledged, the fight to protect our Second Amendment right never ends.

January 11, 2019
Firearms Policy Coalition's Morning Coffee with Craig - Ohio Legislature Tells Anti-Gun Governor to Shove it!

Buckeye Firearms Association Executive Director Dean Rieck was interviewed on the Firearms Policy Coalition's Morning Coffee with Craig. Click here to listen to the episode.

January 8, 2019
GQ Magazine - When You Give a Teacher a Gun

This entire lengthy article is about Buckeye Firearms Foundation's FASTER Saves Lives program.

January 2, 2019
Guns.com - Ohio Lawmakers Override Kasich Veto on Pro-Gun Bill

The bill and its subsequent override were supported by the National Rifle Association and the Buckeye Firearms Association.

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